Discussion:
American Haiku / Jack Kerouac
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Will Dockery
2014-03-24 19:22:14 UTC
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Formating problems on that last thread, so for Michael I'll repost this in a
new thread:

Kerouac called "American Haiku":

"The American Haiku is not exactly the Japanese
Haiku. The Japanese Haiku is strictly disciplined
to seventeen syllables but since the language
structure is different I don't think American
Haikus (short three-line poems intended to be
completely packed with Void of Whole) should worry about syllables because
American speech is something again...bursting to pop.

Above all, a Haiku must be very simple and free
of all poetic trickery and make a little picture
and yet be as airy and graceful as a Vivaldi
Pastorella."
Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac Haiku collection:

http://users.rcn.com/jhudak.interport/Jack.html

Kerouac reading & singing:

http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~gallaher/k_speaks/kerouacspeaks.html

Anyway, either way, Kerouac set the standard for America and the Haiku.
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Check out "Chattahoochee Sunset / Will Dockery, Brian Mallard & Jack
Snipe" -http://www.reverbnation.com/open_graph/song/11459910
Dave Moore
2014-03-29 11:42:10 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Formating problems on that last thread, so for Michael I'll repost this in
"The American Haiku is not exactly the Japanese
Haiku. The Japanese Haiku is strictly disciplined
to seventeen syllables but since the language
structure is different I don't think American
Haikus (short three-line poems intended to be
completely packed with Void of Whole) should worry about syllables because
American speech is something again...bursting to pop.
Above all, a Haiku must be very simple and free
of all poetic trickery and make a little picture
and yet be as airy and graceful as a Vivaldi
Pastorella."
Jack Kerouac
http://users.rcn.com/jhudak.interport/Jack.html
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~gallaher/k_speaks/kerouacspeaks.html
Anyway, either way, Kerouac set the standard for America and the Haiku.
Neither of those two Kerouac links work for me, Will.

Dave
Peter Ceresole
2014-03-29 23:33:26 UTC
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Post by Dave Moore
Post by Will Dockery
http://users.rcn.com/jhudak.interport/Jack.html
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~gallaher/k_speaks/kerouacspeaks.html
Anyway, either way, Kerouac set the standard for America and the Haiku.
Neither of those two Kerouac links work for me, Will.
The first one comes up 'not found', the second one 'Forbidden'. 'You
don't have permission to access /~gallaher/k_speaks/kerouacspeaks.html
on this server.'
--
Peter
Dave Moore
2014-03-30 22:35:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Ceresole
Post by Dave Moore
Post by Will Dockery
http://users.rcn.com/jhudak.interport/Jack.html
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~gallaher/k_speaks/kerouacspeaks.html
Anyway, either way, Kerouac set the standard for America and the Haiku.
Neither of those two Kerouac links work for me, Will.
The first one comes up 'not found', the second one 'Forbidden'. 'You
don't have permission to access /~gallaher/k_speaks/kerouacspeaks.html
on this server.'
--
Peter
Same for me, Peter.

Here's a Kerouac link that should work, though --

http://www.beatbookcovers.com/kercomp/index.htm

Dave
Peter Ceresole
2014-03-31 07:28:06 UTC
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Post by Dave Moore
Here's a Kerouac link that should work, though --
http://www.beatbookcovers.com/kercomp/index.htm
Yes it does. Thanks Dave.
--
Peter
Will Dockery
2015-03-17 06:12:14 UTC
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Post by Dave Moore
Post by Will Dockery
Formating problems on that last thread, so for Michael I'll repost this in
"The American Haiku is not exactly the Japanese
Haiku. The Japanese Haiku is strictly disciplined
to seventeen syllables but since the language
structure is different I don't think American
Haikus (short three-line poems intended to be
completely packed with Void of Whole) should worry about syllables because
American speech is something again...bursting to pop.
Above all, a Haiku must be very simple and free
of all poetic trickery and make a little picture
and yet be as airy and graceful as a Vivaldi
Pastorella."
Jack Kerouac
Neither of those two Kerouac links work for me, Will.
I notice that, Dave... perhaps there were copyright problems?

Finding a wealth of good reading in the Paris Review interview.

More Haiku instructions from Jack Kerouac...

http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/4260/the-art-of-fiction-no-41-jack-kerouac

"Haiku is best reworked and revised. I know, I tried. It has to be completely economical, no foliage and flowers and language rhythm, it has to be a simple little picture in three little lines. At least that's the way the old masters did it, spending months on three little lines and coming up, say, with:

In the abandoned boat,
The hail
Bounces about.

That's Shiki." -Jack Kerouac

(Kerouac excerpted for example, discussion and educational fair use purposes.)

http://www.poemhunter.com/masaoka-shiki/biography/

"Masaoka Shiki (September 17, 1867 - September 19, 1902) was the pen-name of a Japanese author, poet, literary critic, and journalist in Meiji period Japan. His real name was Masaoka Tsunenori , but as a child he was called Tokoronosuke . Later, he changed his name to Noboru. Shiki was a strong advocate of modernization of Japanese poetry, introducing the terms haiku to replace stand-alone hokku, and tanka to replace the 31-mora waka..."
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